Local News

Brentwood voters reject housing development plan

By November 11, 2019 No Comments
Opponents of Measure L rally ahead of the election in Brentwood. Had it been approved, the measure would have allowed more housing development on the city's western border. (Photo Courtesy of Alliance for a Better Brentwood)

Voters in Brentwood have scuttled a ballot measure that would have cleared the way for construction of up to 2,400 housing units and 225 acres of designated open space on an 815-acre area on the city’s western border.

More than 71 percent of voters this month opposed Measure L, according to complete unofficial election results.

City staff had estimated that if approved, the development would generate surplus annual revenue between $2.6 million and $3.1 million from developer impact fees going to the city and up to $2.5 million in operating revenue for the East Contra Costa Fire Protection District, which would have provided fire service to residents in the area.

The site sits between Brentwood and Antioch, bounded by Balfour and Deer Valley roads. It includes up to 20 acres in the southwest corner that could be used for commercial facilities, civic development and senior care facilities. The housing itself would be mostly age-restricted.

Proponents included former Mayor Barbara Guise and Brentwood Union School District board member Carlos Sanabria who argued that Measure L would create jobs, improve road conditions and permanently preserve more than 1,700 acres of open space between Brentwood and Mount Diablo.

In an argument filed with the Contra Costa County elections department, they also pointed out that since at least 80 percent of housing constructed would be for seniors, Measure L would generate revenue for local schools without adding many students to the area.

Opponents including Alliance for a Better Brentwood, John Pock from Carpenters Local Union 152 and other Brentwood residents, argued that Measure L would turn more than 800 acres of scenic hills and farmland into a medium-density development, destroying open space views.

The alliance also argued that Brentwood needs more jobs, rather than more housing, and that 2,400 new residential units would stress the area’s fire services, schools and transportation infrastructure.